Tag Archives: singing

‘From Flanders’ at University of Exeter this Wednesday

On Wednesday 12 December, the accomplished University of Exeter Chapel Choir will perform From Flanders as part of their Nine Lessons and Carols at the Mary Harris Memorial Chapel. This special performance of From Flanders marks the centenary of the WWI Armistice. All are welcome at this beautiful and traditional candlelit carol service, which will be followed by free mince pies and mulled wine served downstairs in the University’s Old Library.

Visit the University Chaplaincy website to find out more.

Summer Singing Day 2016

Following the success of last year’s summer singing day, Peter Nickol and Anna Matthews are once again holding a gathering of singers in Exeter to work through some of their own choral compositions. The date is set for Saturday 3rd September. We are on the look out for keen singers in all voice parts – please get in touch if you are interested in joining us.

Christmas performances this week

Anna’s carol From Flanders, commemorating 100 years since the First World War Christmas truce, will be performed by Exeter Philharmonic Choir in two concerts at Exeter Cathedral this week. The programme will feature carols old and new and a chance for some audience participation with the classics.

Wednesday 10th and 11th December, 7:30pm, tickets available from www.ticketsource.co.uk/exeterphilchoir or on the door.

Carols2014

New: Carmichael setting for double choir

Waverley Turner Carmichael was an African-American poet born in Alabama in the late 19th century. His poem ‘Keep me, Jesus, keep me’ has an attractive
call-and-response structure which lends itself ideally to song and particularly to a setting for double choir. Indeed, a collection of Carmichael’s poems was published in 1918 under the title, “From the Heart of a Folk: A Book of Songs”.

 The repetitive use of language in this poem is almost meditative. This new setting reflects this in the serenity of the majority of the music: openly spaced harmonies, calmly lilting time signatures and frequent pauses to hear the voices resonate and fade. In this respect, the work is particularly suited to cathedral performance. The same music is used to set the two strophes, with recurrence of the line, “Keep me, Jesus, keep me,” forming an imploring refrain. Preview the score.Carmichael's "From the heart of a folk"